Diplomatic Standoff: UN Calls for Dialogue Amid Ethiopia-Somalia Dispute Over Maritime Agreement

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    Diplomatic Standoff: UN Calls for Dialogue Amid Ethiopia-Somalia Dispute Over Maritime Agreement

    The diplomatic standoff between Ethiopia and Somalia over Ethiopia's recent maritime agreement with Somaliland has prompted United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to advocate for dialogue as a means of resolution. Tensions flared afte

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The diplomatic standoff between Ethiopia and Somalia over Ethiopia's recent maritime agreement with Somaliland has prompted United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to advocate for dialogue as a means of resolution. Tensions flared after Ethiopia, a landlocked nation, entered into a significant deal with Somaliland on January 1, granting Ethiopia access to the sea. In return, Somaliland, a region that declared independence in 1991 without international recognition, expects formal acknowledgment from Ethiopia, although the latter has not confirmed this.

Somalia has taken a firm stance against the maritime pact, rejecting any mediation with Ethiopia unless the agreement is nullified. Somalia has pledged to use all legal avenues to oppose the deal. Guterres' call for dialogue echoes similar appeals from global actors, including the United States, China, the European Union, the African Union, and the Arab League, all emphasizing the importance of respecting Somali sovereignty.

The historical context between Ethiopia and Somalia is marked by strained relations and territorial conflicts, including two wars in the late 20th century. The current agreement involves Somaliland leasing a stretch of its coastline to Ethiopia for 50 years, enabling Ethiopia to establish a naval base and a commercial port.

Somalia adamantly rejects Somaliland's claim to independence, a declaration made in 1991 that lacks international recognition. Ethiopia, Africa's second most populous country, lost its coastal access when Eritrea seceded in 1993, leading to a war between the two nations from 1998 to 2000. Since then, Ethiopia has conducted most of its sea trade through Djibouti.

The situation underscores the need for diplomatic efforts and dialogue to address the concerns of all involved parties, ensuring a peaceful resolution to the dispute. Despite Somaliland's relative stability, Somalia continues to grapple with decades of civil unrest and a persistent Islamist insurgency.

Akhrise hoos kadhiibo fikirkaaga


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